National Repository of Grey Literature 18 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.02 seconds. 
The Reception of Narcotics by British Scientists and Society in the First Half of the 19th Century
Michlová, Marie ; Tumis, Stanislav (advisor) ; Valkoun, Jaroslav (referee)
The bachelor thesis analyzes how the British society and scientists perceived the narcotics in the Great Britain during the first half of the 19th century. Numerous sources (including the period medical books, popular magazines, fiction, and letters) were used for this work. The aim was to compare how the people of different professions, ages, education, or rank perceived the narcotics and what had influenced their opinions. There are also several chapters about the physicians and their reception of narcotics, travelers and itineraries, the Opium Wars, animals, and one detailed study about Sir Walter Scott's family.
Prof. Rudolf Jedlička (1869-1926) and the medical and social institutions bound up with his activities
Černá, Marcela ; Jakubec, Ivan (advisor) ; Rákosník, Jakub (referee)
Rudolf Jedlička belongs to the most important Czech doctors of the beginning of the 20th century. After finishing his studies he engaged, under the influence of his favourite professor Karel Maydl, in surgery. Nevertheless he was very soon interested in X-ray science and radiology - the science branches, which were just newly being formed, and whose pioneer in the central Europe he became. Jedlička was often consulted as a diagnostic and operator thanks to his many-sided medical skills. He connected his life with the Faculty of Medicine of the Czech Charles-Ferdinand University, respectively Charles University, where he was engaged as an educationalist - creator of so called Jedlička school, which became bearer of his medical heritage. He reached the top of his career in 1921, when he was designated as regular professor of surgery and simultaneously head of the II. Clinic of Surgery. Rudolf Jedlička did not limit his activities only to medical theory and practice, but he was also initiator and organizer of many medical and social projects, the most important of which was the foundation of Prague sanatorium and neighbouring Jedlička foundation. Prague sanatorium was opened in May 1914 as a general hospital covering all specializations except of infectious and mental illnesses. The sanatorium arrived...
The French Pox in the 16th Century Medical Consilia
Divišová, Bohdana ; Černý, Karel (advisor) ; Žalud, Zdeněk (referee) ; Čornejová, Ivana (referee)
Summary: Consilia played an important role in medieval but also early modern professional health literature. Literary "consilium" contained a written statement of one particular case, the patient's condition and disease as well as advice on a medical procedure where a doctor in accordance with the contemporary discourse analyzed symptoms, determined the diagnosis, prognosis and recommended its pharmacological treatment including possible technical interventions (venesection etc.). In the 16th century, the Consilia Literature was a common part of many eminent physicians' practice whereas nowadays it is unjustly neglected source of history of medicine, pharmacology, dietetics and so on. The first part of the dissertation is devoted to the definition of genre, the initial stages of its development and description of the specifics of the Middle Ages. However the results of fifteen eminent physicians of Italy (B. Vettori, G. B. Da Monte, V. Trincavelli, A. M. Venusti, G. Capodivaccio, C. Guarinoni), France (J. Fernel, G. de Baillou) and of the German-speaking areas of Central Europe (J. Crato, R. Solenander, L. Scholz, D. Cornarius, J. Wittich, T. Mermann, J. Matthaeus), became the main theme of work of early modern consultative collections. On examination of nearly seven thousand consilia from twenty two...
Healing of wounds during history and nowadays.
ŠVANCÁROVÁ, Kristina
My bachelor thesis "Healing of wounds over course of time" has a theoretical character. Its aim is to analyse the development of wound healing as an integral part of nursing care from prehistoric times up to the present days. This work is a historical-analytical study of primary and secondary literal sources with a following elaboration of an interpretative text. To achieve this it was crucial to set a few research questions: What was the development of wound care from a historical perspective? What influenced wound healing in the historical context? In connection with these research questions it can be stated that the development of wound care started in prehistoric times, where it was influenced by the development of society. Further on it developed in connection with some major events. Among these we can name mostly the influence of Christianity in the Middle Ages, building of medical facilities thanks to the Theresian and King Josef's reforms during the Enlightenment period. Last but not least we have to mention the 19th century which was a breakthrough for the development of wound care due to the new position of women in medicine, nursing as a profession, the establishment of nursing schools and the systematic training of nurses, which continues to develop up to the present days. The historical context that has had an impact on wound healing is characterized in prehistoric and ancient times primarily by the organization of society, religion, and cultural practices that have led to a development of surgery. In the Middle Ages the methods of wound healing stagnated, in comparison with Renaissance, where, thanks to Paré, Mondeville and Paracels, surgery underwent a significant development. The era of Enlightenment and the 19th century were characterized by the development of war surgery, the industrial revolution, the discovery of antisepsis (Lister) and antibiotics (Fleming). Furthermore, the 20th and 21st century were significant due to the discovery of modern materials for wet wound healing and various medical treatments used in wound healing.
Measuring Czechoslovaks. Czech Society of Biotypology and Constitutional Medicine in Czechoslovakia 1937-1959
Musil, Jan ; Hermann, Tomáš (advisor) ; Šimůnek, Michal (referee) ; Svobodný, Petr (referee)
This doctoral thesis describes the formation, activities and dissolution of the Czech Society of Biotypology (1937-1959), herein used as an example of impact of the constitutional typology (human typology science) on the Czechoslovak medicine. Human constitution science (in French and Romance languages called biotypology) classifies individual human beings on the base of morphological and physiological characteristics, with particular emphasis on forecast of future trends. The core of the science focuses on correlation between the physical appearance of a person and his/her mental characteristics. The Czech Society of Biotypology (Česká společnost biotypologická - ČSB) was founded with ambitions not only to study human beings, but also to increase their potential. The whole movement was therefore conceived as an example of a sanitation scientific program in accordance with the governmental interest in rationalization of population care. The methodology of the thesis is based on Foucault's concept of biopower - change of power strategies and their constitutive influence on the development and change of social relations, values and individual strategies of persons. The story of formation and dissolution of ČSB is interpreted as a consequence of these changes. The core of the thesis consists of a...
The French Pox in the 16th Century Medical Consilia
Divišová, Bohdana ; Černý, Karel (advisor) ; Žalud, Zdeněk (referee) ; Čornejová, Ivana (referee)
Summary: Consilia played an important role in medieval but also early modern professional health literature. Literary "consilium" contained a written statement of one particular case, the patient's condition and disease as well as advice on a medical procedure where a doctor in accordance with the contemporary discourse analyzed symptoms, determined the diagnosis, prognosis and recommended its pharmacological treatment including possible technical interventions (venesection etc.). In the 16th century, the Consilia Literature was a common part of many eminent physicians' practice whereas nowadays it is unjustly neglected source of history of medicine, pharmacology, dietetics and so on. The first part of the dissertation is devoted to the definition of genre, the initial stages of its development and description of the specifics of the Middle Ages. However the results of fifteen eminent physicians of Italy (B. Vettori, G. B. Da Monte, V. Trincavelli, A. M. Venusti, G. Capodivaccio, C. Guarinoni), France (J. Fernel, G. de Baillou) and of the German-speaking areas of Central Europe (J. Crato, R. Solenander, L. Scholz, D. Cornarius, J. Wittich, T. Mermann, J. Matthaeus), became the main theme of work of early modern consultative collections. On examination of nearly seven thousand consilia from twenty two...

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