National Repository of Grey Literature 4 records found  Search took 0.02 seconds. 
The Phenomenon of Death in Great Britain 1815-1855
Michlová, Marie ; Holý, Martin (advisor) ; Lenderová, Milena (referee) ; Županič, Jan (referee)
This dissertation examines the phenomenon of death in the United Kingdom between 1815 and 1855. It analyses the attitudes of chiefly pre-victorian society towards death, using a synthesis of several different perspectives. Various aspects of death, dying and burial are thus viewed through the lens of contemporary law, medicine, the press, and the arts. Primary personal sources are also used. The multi-layered work combines a number of historical methods and as a whole can be classified as research into historical everyday life and mentalities. Chronologically, the thesis is between two wars, the Napoleonic and the Crimean wars. The 1820s-40s are one of the least researched periods of British history, so this dissertation fills something of a gap in existing research not only concerning the history of death in Britain. Keywords: 19th century, society, death, British history
The Reception of Narcotics by British Scientists and Society in the First Half of the 19th Century
Michlová, Marie ; Tumis, Stanislav (advisor) ; Valkoun, Jaroslav (referee)
The bachelor thesis analyzes how the British society and scientists perceived the narcotics in the Great Britain during the first half of the 19th century. Numerous sources (including the period medical books, popular magazines, fiction, and letters) were used for this work. The aim was to compare how the people of different professions, ages, education, or rank perceived the narcotics and what had influenced their opinions. There are also several chapters about the physicians and their reception of narcotics, travelers and itineraries, the Opium Wars, animals, and one detailed study about Sir Walter Scott's family.
Hidalgo or John Gibson Lockhart's Biography
Michlová, Marie ; Klusáková, Luďa (advisor) ; Kovář, Martin (referee)
The thesis is about life and personality of John Gibson Lockhart (1794-1854), who was a notable Scottish literary critic and biographer. The first part of the thesis is a brief narrative of his life. The second part is dedicated to the history and manners of Lockhart's family, which was closely related to Sir Walter Scott. This family is compared with a typical family of the period. The third part is tracing Lockhart's influence over the Scottish national movement.
The Reception of Narcotics by British Scientists and Society in the First Half of the 19th Century
Michlová, Marie ; Tumis, Stanislav (advisor) ; Valkoun, Jaroslav (referee)
The bachelor thesis analyzes how the British society and scientists perceived the narcotics in the Great Britain during the first half of the 19th century. Numerous sources (including the period medical books, popular magazines, fiction, and letters) were used for this work. The aim was to compare how the people of different professions, ages, education, or rank perceived the narcotics and what had influenced their opinions. There are also several chapters about the physicians and their reception of narcotics, travelers and itineraries, the Opium Wars, animals, and one detailed study about Sir Walter Scott's family.

See also: similar author names
2 MICHLOVÁ, Magdaléna
3 MICHLOVÁ, Markéta
2 Michlová, Magdalena
3 Michlová, Markéta