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Middle-earth versus Westeros
OPATRNÁ, Lenka
This work deals with two fictional universes that have left a significant mark in the canon of fantasy literature. The first is Tolkien's Middle-earth, and the second is Martin's Westeros. The work draws primarily on their novels so that we can better compare their narratological practices. For Tolkien, it is also for the reason that all the books from Middle-earth, apart from the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, were published after his death, and therefore we can only speculate about the final form he would give them. From Martin's writing is fundamental for this thesis the saga A Song of Ice and Fire. As the theoretical basis of this work serves primarily the work of Seymour Chatman, Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan and Lubomír Doležel. Through their theories is taken look at both fictional worlds and gradually are shown their differences which we can notice while reading them. Especially at the level of storyteller and character type. The difference of fictional universes is also shown to us in the modal limitations to which they are subjected. We can notice the biggest differences especially in the distinction between good and evil, which is subjected to axiological limitation, and then in the deontic limitation, which presents us with the norms and rules of fictional worlds. The last part of the work is dedicated to adaptations of our novels, to the film trilogies The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, directed by Peter Jackson, and the TV series Game of Thrones produced by HBO and the creative duo David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. Thanks to a change of medium, we came across some undescribed parts of stories that we would not otherwise notice in the literature. And we also got a glimpse of what happens to the story when we change the media. Every literary story has to go through the changes that are forced by the conversion into an audio-visual message. At the end of the thesis is raised the idea that the incomparable was compared. This is because if we were to follow the set parameters, we would necessarily have to conclude that the stories written by Tolkien are actually fairy tales for children and are communicated accordingly. In contrast, A Song of Ice and Fire is a very complicated piece that requires a more experienced reader and certainly cannot be considered as children's literature.
Rhetoric of the image in contemporary media
OPATRNÁ, Lenka
This Bachelor thesis addresses primarily modern myths and rhetoric of the image as they are represented in the theory of Roland Barthes. Barthes' reflections are supported by the thoughts of Jean Baudrillard whose approach to modern media is very similar but differs in the usage of the terms simulacrum and hyperreality. A slightly different view of modern media is provided by Marshall McLuhan and his theory of "hot" and "cool" media. In this thesis, the theories are applied to specific visual messages.

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2 Opatrná, Lucie
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