National Repository of Grey Literature 5 records found  Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Syntactic constancy of the object between English and Czech in fiction and academic prose
Slunečková, Lenka ; Dušková, Libuše (advisor) ; Malá, Markéta (referee) ; Urbanová, Ludmila (referee)
The present study investigates the constancy of the syntactic function of the object between English and Czech. Syntactic constancy is understood as identical syntactic representation of lexical items in parallel texts taken from different languages. The analysis of instances of syntactic divergence is carried out in order to test the assumption that syntactic structure is hierarchically subordinate to the information structure, i.e. the universal validity of the principle of end focus. The two languages under study, English and Czech, provide typologically suitable subject matter in representing, respectively, an analytic and an inflectional language system which involve different hierarchies of the word order principles. 1 In contrast to previous research, the present treatment is based on a substantially larger corpus (1000 divergent instances) and includes two different stylistic varieties, fiction and academic prose. These two novel aspects are considered to be relevant not only for verifying or modifying the findings obtained from studies investigating other clause elements2 and/or based on fiction alone, but also, more importantly, for capturing and specifying other potential factors conducive to syntactic divergence both in different languages and in different styles.
Presentation sentences in fiction and academic prose: a syntactico-semantic, FSP and textual view
Rohrauer, Leona ; Dušková, Libuše (advisor) ; Urbanová, Ludmila (referee) ; Adam, Martin (referee)
The aim of the present thesis is to analyze syntactic realisations of the Presentation Scale (presentation sentences) as they are defined in the framework of Functional Sentence Perspective (FSP). Several aspects are examined: the semantic aspect is reflected in the observation of the semantic character of the presentation verb and in the semantic affinity it displays with its subject. From the syntactic viewpoint, the sentential architecture of presentation sentences is examined as well as the distribution of the syntactic realisations in text. The study also offers results as regards sentences implementing the Extended Presentation Scale, namely the syntactic realisation of the dynamic semantic function of Specification. The textual aspects concern the correlation between the type of presentation sentence, its location within a paragraph and its textual function. All the above-mentioned aspects are examined in sentences excerpted from texts of two different functional styles, viz. academic prose and fiction. The corpus on which the analysis is based comprises 1731 presentation sentences, 826 from texts of academic prose and 905 from texts of fiction. The theoretical part of the thesis aims both at presenting the FSP theory as it was developed by Jan Firbas and his followers and at a comprehensive...
The positions of finite and non-finite subject clauses
Smolka, Vladislav ; Dušková, Libuše (advisor) ; Šaldová, Pavlína (referee) ; Urbanová, Ludmila (referee)
Owing to its typological characteristics, English displays limited positional mobility of clause constituents, their position within the clause being an important signal of their syntactic function. At the same time, clause constituents may move out of their usual position if prompted by factors such as emphasis, structural complexity, information status, etc. What is true of clause constituents also applies to some extent to whole clauses. Unlike coordinate clauses in a compound sentence, subordinate clauses, particularly adverbial, may vary in their position, either preceding, following or even being inserted into their superordinate clause, with the resulting linear arrangement reflecting the relative weight of information which they convey, with the informationally heavier element placed finally. The position of nominal clauses and nominal relative clauses is determined largely by the usual position of the syntactic element they represent (i.e. the object clauses following the matrix clause predicate, etc.). Subject clauses, which represent the focus of this dissertation, are basically limited to two positions in relation to their matrix clauses: they either occupy the canonical initial position (i.e. before the matrix clause predicate) or are extraposed towards the end of the sentence, following the...
Syntactic constancy of the object between English and Czech in fiction and academic prose
Slunečková, Lenka ; Dušková, Libuše (advisor) ; Malá, Markéta (referee) ; Urbanová, Ludmila (referee)
The present study investigates the constancy of the syntactic function of the object between English and Czech. Syntactic constancy is understood as identical syntactic representation of lexical items in parallel texts taken from different languages. The analysis of instances of syntactic divergence is carried out in order to test the assumption that syntactic structure is hierarchically subordinate to the information structure, i.e. the universal validity of the principle of end focus. The two languages under study, English and Czech, provide typologically suitable subject matter in representing, respectively, an analytic and an inflectional language system which involve different hierarchies of the word order principles. 1 In contrast to previous research, the present treatment is based on a substantially larger corpus (1000 divergent instances) and includes two different stylistic varieties, fiction and academic prose. These two novel aspects are considered to be relevant not only for verifying or modifying the findings obtained from studies investigating other clause elements2 and/or based on fiction alone, but also, more importantly, for capturing and specifying other potential factors conducive to syntactic divergence both in different languages and in different styles.
Syntactic constancy of the object between English and Czech in fiction and academic prose
Slunečková, Lenka ; Dušková, Libuše (advisor) ; Malá, Markéta (referee) ; Urbanová, Ludmila (referee)
The present study investigates the constancy of the syntactic function of the object between English and Czech. Syntactic constancy is understood as identical syntactic representation of lexical items in parallel texts taken from different languages. The analysis of instances of syntactic divergence is carried out in order to test the assumption that syntactic structure is hierarchically subordinate to the information structure, i.e. the universal validity of the principle of end focus. The two languages under study, English and Czech, provide typologically suitable subject matter in representing, respectively, an analytic and an inflectional language system which involve different hierarchies of the word order principles. 1 In contrast to previous research, the present treatment is based on a substantially larger corpus (1000 divergent instances) and includes two different stylistic varieties, fiction and academic prose. These two novel aspects are considered to be relevant not only for verifying or modifying the findings obtained from studies investigating other clause elements2 and/or based on fiction alone, but also, more importantly, for capturing and specifying other potential factors conducive to syntactic divergence both in different languages and in different styles.

See also: similar author names
6 URBANOVÁ, Lenka
19 URBANOVÁ, Lucie
1 Urbanová, Ladislava
6 Urbanová, Lenka
2 Urbanová, Linda
2 Urbanová, Lucia
19 Urbanová, Lucie
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