National Library of Technology

Latest additions:
2019-10-07
11:48
ZÍSKEJ – national system for sharing and delivering documents
Pokorný, Jan
A software platform called “ZÍSKEJ” (Get it) for documents sharing and delivery was designed and developed at the National Library of Technology as a nationwide system for public libraries in the Czech Republic. The project was supported by the Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic. The system ZÍSKEJ is published as open source with a GNU Public License (GPL). ZÍSKEJ is a server application that is capable of managing user’s document requests through its web client or local integration using the available API. The system is based on a request management module that automatically handles the queue of incoming requests to deliver the document requested by end users or by libraries that serve end-users.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
When there’s only one: resource sharing and the predicament of the dissertation request
Eighmy Brown, Melissa ; Smith, Austin ; Thompson, Hilary H.
Electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) are one of the many resources interspersed throughout the current environment of online content. The past two decades have witnessed a shift from print to electronic theses and dissertations and an accompanying growth in university mandates requiring deposit of ETDs in institutional repositories. While these changes should have paved the way for unfettered online access, barriers such as embargoes requested by the author and vendor licensing restrictions have also emerged, hampering access to these unpublished works. Likewise, policies governing cataloging, deposit, and repository access may differ widely across institutions, adding further complexity to the landscape. Interlibrary Loan practitioners are looking for ways to share this unique content and help users navigate the terrain despite the obstacles. This presentation will explore recent trends in thesis requesting and fulfillment using borrowing and lending requests for theses and dissertations from two U.S. public research universities, along with the perspectives of colleagues at peer institutions. These data sets demonstrate that the demand for these materials extends across borders, raising the question: how can we encourage the sharing of ETDs on a global scale? The authors hope their research on the accessibility of theses and dissertations will inform the international academic community on ways to improve the sharing of these important institutional assets, including raising awareness of the need for a policy and workflow that permits controlled ILL lending of embargoed ETDs that mirrors lending of print dissertations.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
International interlibrary loan in a changing environment: results from the 2019 RUSA STARS international ILL survey
Munson, Kurt ; Thompson, Hilary H.
In 2019 the American Library Association (ALA) Reference & User Services Association’s Sharing and Transforming Access to Resources Section (RUSA STARS) International Interlibrary Loan Committee conducted its fourth survey of international interlibrary loan policies and practices. This survey was widely distributed to libraries worldwide, in coordination with IFLA’s Document Delivery & Resource Sharing Section, including for the first time translations in six of the seven official IFLA languages. While reusing questions from prior survey instruments allowed for longitudinal analysis of quantitative data, the 2019 survey also included new open response questions that delve deeper into how the global library community can build upon its success in sharing resources across borders in order to improve this service for future users. On behalf of the committee, the authors will present select survey results, focusing on the evolving role of international ILL in an increasingly complex resource discovery and delivery ecosystem. Data-informed strategies to overcome challenges currently facing this service and to optimize global delivery solutions will be shared.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
In-transit practices among multi-campus university libraries in Turkey
Cuhadar, Sami ; Cimen, Ertugrul ; Turan, Abdullah
Library in-transit services provided between various campuses of a university are important, helping to ensure user satisfaction, effective allocation of library budgets, optimum use of resources, and effective use of library spaces. In this study, 179 universities operating in Turkey were identified and selected for assessment. The methods which libraries at these universities employ to deliver information resources to users at other campuses as well as their in-transit practices are explained in detail. The paper presents the findings of a survey that was conducted at the selected university libraries in order to assess the current state and the impact of resource sharing via the in-transit method on library budgets, library spaces, and user satisfaction. The in-transit practice of Istanbul Bilgi University (BİLGİ) Library, which has a well-established in-transit policy and which keeps detailed statistics, was also used as a case study to analyze in-transit statistics and survey findings and to provide suggestions for future improvement. Design/methodology/approach: This study employed a historical and explanatory approach; statistical methods are used to analyze the results of the survey. An important outcome of the study was that it documented the current status of in-transit practices at academic universities in Turkey. The authors utilized their professional experiences in developing resource sharing and in-transit services within a university library context in Turkey in order to design the survey. Objectives: This research paper might be useful for any university librarians interested in resource sharing, effective use of library budgets, library collections, and library spaces, especially in developing countries. The paper also provides academic libraries with a set of guidelines for establishing an in-transit service. Originality/value: This paper is the first study of in-transit services provided between Turkish university libraries. It also addresses the opportunities and challenges that arise when establishing or improving in-transit services. The results of the study will be of use to university libraries, researchers, and library professionals working in the field.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
A progressive approach to reducing barriers to resource sharing: a Canadian example
Askey, Dale ; Jong, CJ de ; Koufogiannakis, Denise
The University of Alberta Library (UAL) holds one of the largest collections in Western Canada and recently opened a storage facility with capacity for five million volumes. UAL’s collection and staffing capacity make us a significant net lender of materials to other libraries. Being cognizant of this role, UAL is attempting, via consortial bodies at the local, provincial, regional, and national levels, to advance a progressive approach to resource sharing by reducing administrative burden and strategically working towards new ways of resource sharing via digital means. This presentation outlines our context and approach, offering a sense of adaptability and scalability that could be replicated in other contexts. Scaling and extending the work UAL does at the provincial level to the regional and national level requires us to demonstrate a high degree of commitment to our partners. Often, net lenders can be hesitant to open the gates to their collections for fear of creating unmanageable demand. We accept that risk and, in general, are trying to develop a stronger sense of risk tolerance. One strategy we pursue is to remove barriers in resource sharing, via concrete actions such as the elimination of fees that generate small amounts of income from lending, longer and more flexible loan periods, and controlled digital access to unique materials. UAL is developing digitization priorities in part to support this practice, facilitating greater access to our consortial partners and anyone needing access to materials we may uniquely hold. Within a complex global environment, UAL continues to look for ways to reduce barriers to information, and to share our resources widely in keeping with our University’s raison d’etre of “uplifting the whole people”.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
UKRR – a collaborative collection management strategy
Appleyard, Andrew
The British Library is one of the greatest research libraries in the world. It holds in excess of 150 million items, from original print newspapers to manuscripts, books, journals sound recordings and unique personal archives. The collection is both historic and contemporary bringing together the nation’s memory for the purpose of cultural appreciation and research. In terms of meeting its defined purposes1, the British Library (BL) must transform to meet the current and future needs of research demands because the way in which society seeks knowledge has changed. The traditional library is one of card catalogues and reference numbers that navigate the researcher in an analogue world to the knowledge they seek. Nowadays researchers expect the data and content in their hands anywhere, in dynamic and social spaces, rejecting the past norms of formal research establishments. As the BL adjusts to accommodate this need it must still maintain access to its print collections and of course preserve them for future generations. The UK Research Reserve (UKRR) project set the ambitious target of saving 100km of shelf space within University Libraries by de-duplicating low use print journals on the premise that a master, accessible copy is held by the BL. This collaboration between the BL, UK Higher Education and (formerly) the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) has subsequently delivered 128km of library shelf space amounting to £29m in capital savings, and over £18m in recurring estate management costs. This paper describes the evolution of the new access and preservation approach building on the UKRR project outcomes. It will explain how print preservation and access can fit harmoniously alongside a digital strategy reflecting the need for a wider access model that democratises access to content whilst ensuring preservation for future generations. It will also contextualise the approach as part of the national Library’s mandate and why the combination has proven to be a recipe of success.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
Project ReShare: an open, community-owned, resource sharing solution
Dethloff, Nora ; Ibbotson, Ian ; Rose, Kristina ; Thompson, Sydney
The ReShare Community is a group of libraries, information organizations, and developers, with both commercial and non-commercial interests, who came together in 2018 to create a new and open approach to library resource sharing systems. Libraries have long established protocols and agreements among local, regional, national, and international networks to provide discovery and access to print and digital resources, extending the use and value of each library’s collection exponentially. However, current resource sharing solutions leave much to be desired. The marketplace has been characterized by stagnating technology, closed or siloed environments, and a consolidation of commercial options, leaving consortia to desire a fresh start; a re-imagined infrastructure that promotes an increased ability to innovate, experiment, and communicate across diverse library systems (ILS, discovery, resource sharing, etc.) and more sustainably pursue shared collection development and print retention initiatives. ReShare aims to inject new life into the space by developing a community-owned, modular resource sharing platform, enabling libraries and consortia to place library users at the center, from discovery, to request management and fulfillment. Project ReShare’s key differentiator is its foundation as a wholly community-owned solution. This approach offers libraries and commercial partners a fundamentally new model for shaping collections and connecting people with what they need, by greatly deepening our ability to collaborate and develop systems responsive to the needs of libraries and their users. In this paper, members of the Project ReShare Steering Committee and Product Management Team explore the frustrations with the current resource sharing environment, share perspectives on the importance of community-owned, open source tools, and discuss the benefits of this type of collaboration for the library community at large. The paper tells the story of Project ReShare, including how it is being developed, how the community has grown, and the potential for this new resource sharing solution.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
Opportunities and challenges: the current situation of copyright protection for document supply in China
Xing, Zhao
Purpose: This study aims to explore and articulate the copyright problems of document supply resulting from changes in the digital age in China, introducing current Chinese Copyright Law and “fair use” in library services and exploring the challenges and opportunities of copyright protection for document supply in China. Design: From statistical analysis of the changes to document delivery services in the digital age based on the professional experiences of National Library of China (NLC), copyright problems are presented. Current Chinese Copyright Law and “fair use” are introduced. The measures NLC has taken to protect copyright in document supply are summarized. Findings: With increasing digital document delivery, the potential risks of copyright infringement in document supply have become more and more serious; we must take proper steps to protect copyright, especially in the digital age in China. Value: This is the first article in English to describe the current situation of copyright protection for document supply in China. It also presents the problems based on the professional experiences of NLC and recommends solutions for the digital age today.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
Narrowing the gap of the digital divide: how NSTL contributes
Xu, Xiaomu ; Leng, Ling
In China, a digital divide results from geographical conditions, unbalanced economic development, individual differences, and other factors. To bridge this gap and to weaken the polarisation between the “information wealthy” and the “information poor,” a federal, Internet-based library, the National Science and Technology Library (NSTL), has been founded. This paper will introduce what NSTL is and how NSTL contributes to narrowing the gaps in order to reduce differences between the two groups in access to science and technology information and resources. NSTL consists of 9 library members, all of which are national authoritative libraries in different disciplines, respectively covering the natural sciences, engineering, agriculture, medicine, standards, and other fields. First, to narrow the gap caused by geographical conditions, NSTL has built 40 service stations covering 29 provinces, thus forming a nationwide information service network with the help of local and industrial scientific information institutions. This action not only guarantees resource sharing to the whole country, but also improves the service abilities of local providers. Second, to narrow the gap caused by unbalanced economic development, approximately 25,000 types of print resources that are state-funded can be unconditionally supplied to the public at reasonable prices, especially with low prices for remote and poor areas. Document delivery services are ordered over 400,000 times every year. Nearly 4,000 kinds of electronic journals are free for all domestic welfare and educational group users via Internet protocol address permissions. Third, to narrow the gap caused by individual differences, NSTL provides an integrated discovery system on the basis of unified cataloguing so that everyone can search literature easily. NSTL also organises trainings and seminars across the country, introducing and promoting resources to all communities. In addition, NSTL strives to explore approaches to international information access and to foster cooperation opportunities in order to close the gaps between countries.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record
2019-10-07
11:48
Meeting users in their spaces: key findings on discovery to delivery
Connaway, Lynn Silipigni ; Cyr, Chris ; Gallagher, Peggy ; Hood, Erin M. ; Brannon, Brittany
OCLC Research has been studying how individuals get their information and resources and how they engage with technology for almost two decades. We have learned that convenience often is one of the factors that most drives individuals’ decisions for getting information and resources. However, convenience is a moving target and is dependent upon the context and situation of the individual’s need. Many factors will influence the decision-making process, such as how quickly the information or resource is needed, how important that information is to the individual need, and how much effort is required to get access to the information or resource. Our findings indicate that individuals often do not consider the library as the first place to get information and sometimes do not consider libraries at all. This often is attributed to the complexity and misunderstanding of library processes for acquiring resources and to not knowing resources or options for accessing and acquiring these resources through the library. Many individuals opt for open content since it is easy to discover and readily and quickly available in full-text. We have conducted semi-structured individual interviews with undergraduate and graduate/post graduate students and faculty in Australia and the U.S. to identify how they discover, access and acquire resources and why they make these choices and decisions, including their format preferences. We also have conducted focus group interviews with resource sharing and ILL librarians in Australia and the U.S. to identify their workflows and to discuss ideas to improve these processes to better meet the needs of their users. The findings from these interviews provide ideas for enhancing the discovery to delivery experience for both users and librarians.
Plný text: Stáhnout plný textPDF

Detailed record