National Repository of Grey Literature 13 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
Performance assessment of cloud applications
Sándor, Gábor ; Bureš, Tomáš (advisor) ; Bednárek, David (referee)
Modern CPS and mobile applications like augmented reality or coordinated driving, etc. are envisioned to combine edge-cloud processing with real-time requirements. The real-time requirements however create a brand new challenge for cloud processing which has traditionally been best-effort. A key to guaranteeing real-time requirements is the understanding of how services sharing resources in the cloud interact on the performance level. The objective of the thesis is to design a mechanism which helps to categorize cloud applications based on the type of their workload. This should result in specification of a model defining a set of applications which can be deployed on a single node, while guaranteeing a certain quality of the service. It should be also able to find the optimal node where the application could be deployed.
In-transit practices among multi-campus university libraries in Turkey
Cuhadar, Sami ; Cimen, Ertugrul ; Turan, Abdullah
Library in-transit services provided between various campuses of a university are important, helping to ensure user satisfaction, effective allocation of library budgets, optimum use of resources, and effective use of library spaces. In this study, 179 universities operating in Turkey were identified and selected for assessment. The methods which libraries at these universities employ to deliver information resources to users at other campuses as well as their in-transit practices are explained in detail. The paper presents the findings of a survey that was conducted at the selected university libraries in order to assess the current state and the impact of resource sharing via the in-transit method on library budgets, library spaces, and user satisfaction. The in-transit practice of Istanbul Bilgi University (BİLGİ) Library, which has a well-established in-transit policy and which keeps detailed statistics, was also used as a case study to analyze in-transit statistics and survey findings and to provide suggestions for future improvement. Design/methodology/approach: This study employed a historical and explanatory approach; statistical methods are used to analyze the results of the survey. An important outcome of the study was that it documented the current status of in-transit practices at academic universities in Turkey. The authors utilized their professional experiences in developing resource sharing and in-transit services within a university library context in Turkey in order to design the survey. Objectives: This research paper might be useful for any university librarians interested in resource sharing, effective use of library budgets, library collections, and library spaces, especially in developing countries. The paper also provides academic libraries with a set of guidelines for establishing an in-transit service. Originality/value: This paper is the first study of in-transit services provided between Turkish university libraries. It also addresses the opportunities and challenges that arise when establishing or improving in-transit services. The results of the study will be of use to university libraries, researchers, and library professionals working in the field.
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A progressive approach to reducing barriers to resource sharing: a Canadian example
Askey, Dale ; Jong, CJ de ; Koufogiannakis, Denise
The University of Alberta Library (UAL) holds one of the largest collections in Western Canada and recently opened a storage facility with capacity for five million volumes. UAL’s collection and staffing capacity make us a significant net lender of materials to other libraries. Being cognizant of this role, UAL is attempting, via consortial bodies at the local, provincial, regional, and national levels, to advance a progressive approach to resource sharing by reducing administrative burden and strategically working towards new ways of resource sharing via digital means. This presentation outlines our context and approach, offering a sense of adaptability and scalability that could be replicated in other contexts. Scaling and extending the work UAL does at the provincial level to the regional and national level requires us to demonstrate a high degree of commitment to our partners. Often, net lenders can be hesitant to open the gates to their collections for fear of creating unmanageable demand. We accept that risk and, in general, are trying to develop a stronger sense of risk tolerance. One strategy we pursue is to remove barriers in resource sharing, via concrete actions such as the elimination of fees that generate small amounts of income from lending, longer and more flexible loan periods, and controlled digital access to unique materials. UAL is developing digitization priorities in part to support this practice, facilitating greater access to our consortial partners and anyone needing access to materials we may uniquely hold. Within a complex global environment, UAL continues to look for ways to reduce barriers to information, and to share our resources widely in keeping with our University’s raison d’etre of “uplifting the whole people”.
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Project ReShare: an open, community-owned, resource sharing solution
Dethloff, Nora ; Ibbotson, Ian ; Rose, Kristina ; Thompson, Sydney
The ReShare Community is a group of libraries, information organizations, and developers, with both commercial and non-commercial interests, who came together in 2018 to create a new and open approach to library resource sharing systems. Libraries have long established protocols and agreements among local, regional, national, and international networks to provide discovery and access to print and digital resources, extending the use and value of each library’s collection exponentially. However, current resource sharing solutions leave much to be desired. The marketplace has been characterized by stagnating technology, closed or siloed environments, and a consolidation of commercial options, leaving consortia to desire a fresh start; a re-imagined infrastructure that promotes an increased ability to innovate, experiment, and communicate across diverse library systems (ILS, discovery, resource sharing, etc.) and more sustainably pursue shared collection development and print retention initiatives. ReShare aims to inject new life into the space by developing a community-owned, modular resource sharing platform, enabling libraries and consortia to place library users at the center, from discovery, to request management and fulfillment. Project ReShare’s key differentiator is its foundation as a wholly community-owned solution. This approach offers libraries and commercial partners a fundamentally new model for shaping collections and connecting people with what they need, by greatly deepening our ability to collaborate and develop systems responsive to the needs of libraries and their users. In this paper, members of the Project ReShare Steering Committee and Product Management Team explore the frustrations with the current resource sharing environment, share perspectives on the importance of community-owned, open source tools, and discuss the benefits of this type of collaboration for the library community at large. The paper tells the story of Project ReShare, including how it is being developed, how the community has grown, and the potential for this new resource sharing solution.
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From interlending to resource sharing between scholars?: an analysis of recent developments
Saarti, Jarmo ; Tuominen, Kimmo
Even though resource sharing between scholars is evolving rapidly, we still have paper-based interlibrary lending (ILL) procedures in use. However, the current business model of acquiring toll-access journals and e-books does not seem to fit very well with traditional ILL practices. In addition, the new models of peer-to-peer resource sharing between academics seem to be much more effective than ILL. Scholars arrange access to the needed publications by using legal (buying, exchanging) and illegal means (Sci-Hub, etc.) for accessing the publications they need. Furthermore, the demands for open access (OA) have increased, voiced not only by librarians and science funders but also by politicians. This development might change the scholarly publication ecosystem, even though older publications are still likely to remain closed. In the present paper, we contrast the ILL and usage statistics of Finnish university libraries with the use of ResearchGate, a popular academic social network, which we treat as an example of a peer-to-peer sharing service. Based on the data, we attempt to understand how resource sharing, on the one hand formally between institutions, and on the other hand informally between scholars, will develop in the digital and increasingly open future.
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Cooperative Storage Library Switzerland (CSLS): sharing of content and resources – providing quick and modern services
Tschirren, Daniel ; Grossgarten, Astrid
In the Speicherbibliothek/CSLS libraries of ZHB Luzern, UB Basel, ZB Zuerich, UZH Zuerich and St. Gallen University Library store parts of their holdings. Storage room is tight and expensive in the cities and holdings are growing faster than sorting out of duplicates is being made. A centralized storage unit in a rural area with good traffic connection seemed a logical solution. In 2016 the Speicherbibliothek came into gear. It is build and equipped like a modern high density fully automated storage unit. With regard to monographs and anthologies the stored items belong still to the giving library and still appear in their catalogue system. These items are the so called individual stock of the partners and can be borrowed. With regard to journals things are different. Most of them are now part of the so called collective stock. The goal is a complete series of a stocked journal title. In case of a user request to copies out of a journal the pages will be copied and sent via a workflow system either to the reader or a library. The journal volume itself will not leave the storage unit anymore. The partners of Speicherbibliothek use the same workflow system (MyBib eDoc®) to manage and monitor their lending processes. In the background this system routes the incoming lending or copy requests from the library patrons to CSLS and manages the automated delivery of scanned pages. In addition to the above described outlines the presentation will include following aspects: Restrictions of copyright, Conservational issues, Deduplication (virtual and physical), Visibility of stored items in the catalogue and for the user/impact on requests, Financial aspects vs. librarian wishes
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Aside from payment: the experience of acquisition and mutual use of resources in the Belarus Agricultural Library
Babaryka-Amelchanka, Veranika ; Muravitskaya, Ryma ; Shakura, Natallia
In order to provide users quality information in conjunction with the optimization of financial costs for information resources of the library, they use the opportunity of free acquisition and actively develop cooperation with other libraries and information centers in the field of document changing and resource sharing. In I.S. Lupinovich Belarus Agricultural Library of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus there is functional system which includes, along with paid opportunities, mechanisms for free replenishment of its fund and mutual use of documents. Free acquisition of the fund is possible both thanks to acts regulated by the state and the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, and through the development of partnerships with other libraries, organizations, and individuals through international exchange of documents, function of FAO depository, and receiving literature as a gift. The mutual use of resources is based on national and international interlibrary lending, participation in the World Network of Agricultural Libraries, and cooperation agreements with other libraries. The existing mechanisms contribute to ensuring access of Belarusian users to the world information resources on agriculture, as well as integration of the national sectoral information into the world information space with reduced financial costs.
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The conundrum of resource sharing in Zimbabwe: case of academic libraries
Chisita, Collence Takaingenhamo ; Fombad, Madeleine
Resource sharing has gained impetus among academic libraries as they seek novel and innovative ways to provide for the dynamic and complex needs of users. Zimbabwe is not an exception to the global trend of resource sharing in support of teaching, learning and research as evidenced by the establishment of sector-specific library consortia. This article explores the challenges and opportunities encountered by academic libraries in their endeavour to provide quality services. It will examine how library consortia, namely the Zimbabwe University Library Consortia (ZULC) and the College and Research Libraries of Zimbabwe (CARLC), have been able to provide for the information needs of their users at a time when budgets are low or inadequate and subscription costs to journals remain unaffordable. The article will examine the extent to which library consortia are exploiting information and communication technologies (ICTs) and trendy initiatives, for example Open Access (OA). It will also examine how academic libraries, through resource sharing platforms, have been able to exploit ubiquitous technologies and build on from the traditional interlibrary loan (ILL). The article will recommend a strategy based on a model to strengthen access to scholarship through resource sharing.
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Semantic Enrichment Component
Doležal, Jan ; Otrusina, Lubomír (referee) ; Dytrych, Jaroslav (advisor)
This master's thesis describes Semantic Enrichment Component (SEC), that searches entities (e.g., persons or places) in the input text document and returns information about them. The goals of this component are to create a single interface for named entity recognition tools, to enable parallel document processing, to save memory while using the knowledge base, and to speed up access to its content. To achieve these goals, the output of the named entity recognition tools in the text was specified, the tool for storing the preprocessed knowledge base into the shared memory was implemented, and the client-server scheme was used to create the component.

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