National Repository of Grey Literature 5 records found  Search took 0.00 seconds. 
The role of protein kinase C alpha in individual cancer cell invasiveness
Szabadosová, Emília ; Brábek, Jan (advisor) ; Hlaváčková, Markéta (referee)
Protein kinase C alpha was one of the first identified isoenzyme of PKC family. Since then PKC has been shown to be important in various signal cascades. One of the best known role is in tumor invasiveness and in development of metastases. A role of protein kinase C alpha was pointed out in regulation of Rho/ROCK pathway in amoeboid invasiveness and also Raf/MAPK signaling cascade of mesenchymal movement. ERM proteins, which act in cancer invasiveness, are regulated by protein kinase C too.
Mechanisms of invasiveness and transcription regulation in cancer cells
Tolde, Ondřej ; Folk, Petr (advisor) ; Kovář, Jan (referee) ; Brdička, Tomáš (referee)
The mechanisms of invazivity and regulation of transcription of cancer cells Cancer originates in cells that overcome the control mechanisms of the organism. Cancer cells can be eventually released from the site of origin and spread through tissues. Cancer cells can acquire certain mechanisms that enable them to more effectively invade surrounding tissue or layers of other cells. The research on the migration of cancer cells is important for the understanding of the origin and spreading of metastases and consequently for anticancer therapy. In my Ph.D. work, I participated in the research of the properties of invasive metastatic cells. We compared non-invasive rat sarcoma cell line with a higly metastatic cell line derived from it. We showed that cells of the invasive cell line use amoeboid mode of migration, have upregulated Rho/ROCK signaling, and have accumulated actin and myosin at the leading edge. It is at the leading edge where the cells generate their traction forces. Cells of non-invasive cell line use mesenchymal mode of migration and generate forces mainly at their retracting end. We also compared two breast cancer cell lines derived from a single carcinoma. We showed that the more invasive cell line, derived from its parental line by neoplastic transformation, displayed elevated cytoskeletal...
The role of NG2 glycoprotein in the regulation of Rho/ROCK signaling.
Kratochvílová, Magdalena ; Rösel, Daniel (advisor) ; Libusová, Lenka (referee)
NG2 is a transmembrane glycoprotein mainly expressed in developing tissue, and often re-expressed in tumor cells. NG2 glycoprotein is an important regulator of cell migration and adhesion. Increased expression of NG2 enhances the metastatic potential of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of these processes are still not fully understood. An increasing number of evidences, in recent years, have shown that NG2 can be responsible for Rho/ROCK activation, which is essential for effective amoeboid invasiveness. In this thesis, we analysed the role of NG2 glycoprotein, especially the role of its PDZ- binding motif on amoeboid phenotype induction, and activation of Rho/ROCK signaling. Our results demonstrate the importance of the NG2 PDZ-binding motif on mesenchymal- amoeboid transition of cells in a 3D environment. Surprisingly, they show that the expression of both the NG2 cytoplasmatic domain and the truncated version, lacking the PDZ-binding motif, do not change the amount of Rho-GTP or the activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in 2D.
The role of protein kinase C alpha in individual cancer cell invasiveness
Szabadosová, Emília ; Brábek, Jan (advisor) ; Hlaváčková, Markéta (referee)
Protein kinase C alpha was one of the first identified isoenzyme of PKC family. Since then PKC has been shown to be important in various signal cascades. One of the best known role is in tumor invasiveness and in development of metastases. A role of protein kinase C alpha was pointed out in regulation of Rho/ROCK pathway in amoeboid invasiveness and also Raf/MAPK signaling cascade of mesenchymal movement. ERM proteins, which act in cancer invasiveness, are regulated by protein kinase C too.
Mechanisms of invasiveness and transcription regulation in cancer cells
Tolde, Ondřej ; Folk, Petr (advisor) ; Kovář, Jan (referee) ; Brdička, Tomáš (referee)
The mechanisms of invazivity and regulation of transcription of cancer cells Cancer originates in cells that overcome the control mechanisms of the organism. Cancer cells can be eventually released from the site of origin and spread through tissues. Cancer cells can acquire certain mechanisms that enable them to more effectively invade surrounding tissue or layers of other cells. The research on the migration of cancer cells is important for the understanding of the origin and spreading of metastases and consequently for anticancer therapy. In my Ph.D. work, I participated in the research of the properties of invasive metastatic cells. We compared non-invasive rat sarcoma cell line with a higly metastatic cell line derived from it. We showed that cells of the invasive cell line use amoeboid mode of migration, have upregulated Rho/ROCK signaling, and have accumulated actin and myosin at the leading edge. It is at the leading edge where the cells generate their traction forces. Cells of non-invasive cell line use mesenchymal mode of migration and generate forces mainly at their retracting end. We also compared two breast cancer cell lines derived from a single carcinoma. We showed that the more invasive cell line, derived from its parental line by neoplastic transformation, displayed elevated cytoskeletal...

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