National Repository of Grey Literature 107 records found  beginprevious96 - 105next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
The Image of Czechoslovakia in Simon Mawer's The Glass Room
Šejnohová, Markéta ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
The thesis provides an analysis of the First Czechoslovak Republic in Simon Mawer's novel The Glass Room. The first part of the thesis concentrates on Mawer's life, the beginnings of his writing career, his interest in the Czech Republic and the Villa Tugendhat which inspired him in writing the novel and also on the work's receptions. The second part focuses on history of the First Czechoslovak Republic and on an analysis of this era in Mawer's novel. It deals with Czechoslovak political, social and economic situation, Czechoslovak cultural life and art, minorities issue and growing radicalism of 1930's in The Glass Room and compares and contrasts it with the real Czechoslovakia.
Portrayals of First World War trauma in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Pat Barker's Regeneration
Šmejkal, Petr ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
The aim of this thesis is to explore the portrayals of First World War trauma in Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway and Pat Barker's Regeneration and compare them. The thesis will also try to describe the typical symptoms, possible causes and treatment of the trauma, as portrayed in literature. Since Mrs. Dalloway was one of the first literary works to deal with this kind of trauma, while Regeneration was written many years after the War, the thesis will also try to discover how this fact affected the way the trauma is portrayed in these novels.
The Visions of Consumer Society in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Julian Barnes's England, England
Čiháková, Michaela ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
This bachelor thesis is based on two British literary works - Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932) and Julian Barnes's England, England (1998). The main aim of the thesis is to focus on the visions of consumer society and commodification in these novels and to explore its impact on individuals, culture and society itself. The first part of the thesis is concerned with consumerism, and its historical development and the main part analyses the features of this phenomenon in both dystopian novels. Key words: consumerism; commodification; dystopia; Brave New World; England, England
The Hunger Games Trilogy in Comparison with Classic Dystopian Novels
Míčková, Lucie ; Ženíšek, Jakub (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
This bachelor thesis is focused on how the Hunger Games trilogy compares to classic dystopian works. It is divided into three sections. First, the definition and major features of the dystopian genre are presented. Then I discuss how they are demonstrated in three classic dystopias. The third section focuses on the analysis of the Hunger Games trilogy, as I investigate all the things that are similar to the classics and how they are also innovative. Finally, I summarize the conclusion and decide on a legitimate interpretation of The Hunger Games in dystopian genre. Key Words: Dystopia, anti-utopia, The Hunger Games, 1984, We, Brave New World, Collins.
The portrayal of family in Hanif Kureishi's Intimacy and Elizabeth Day's Scissors Paper Stone
Balážová, Anna ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
This thesis concentrates on the depiction of family in two contemporary British novels. These are: Hanif Kureishiʼs In macy (1998), wri en in the first person narra ve, and Elizabeth Day's Scissors Paper Stone (2011), written in the third person narrative. This thesis analyses the novels from various perspectives with the main emphasis put on the theme of family. It also takes into consideration the different narrative modes used in the novels. In the theoretical part this thesis concentrates on the development of family with the main stress placed on the changes that took place in the second half of the twentieth century in Britain. The topics that it deals with are the breakdown of a relationship, fatherhood, dysfunctional communication and other themes concerning the family and interpersonal relationships.
Women, Family, Marriage and Social Life of the 19th century middle-class society in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and Good Wives
Teislerová, Martina ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
This bachelor thesis is focused on the matters of social status and prospects of middle- class women, family and family relations concerning not only immediate relatives, but also distant ones, social life and the meaning of marriage from the point of view of women in the 19th century England and America. These themes are primarily explored in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and Little Women and Good Wives by Louisa May Alcott. Keywords Women, America, England, 19th century, Family, Marriage, Social Life
Philosophical conception of architecture with reference to Simon Mawer's The Glass Room
Miháliková, Veronika ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
This Bachelor thesis is concerned with the balance between rationality and sensibility in architecture, materialistic and spiritual aspect of architecture, the contrast between the transparency of modern architecture and the lack of transparency of human lives and the impact of the symmetry and beauty on people and their relationships in the period of time referred to (from 1929 until 1989), all with the reference to The Glass Room (2009) by Simon Mawer. The way the book is written is discussed as well.
Reflection of Social, Economic and Cultural Changes in Britain in Selected Early Victorian Fiction
Šišková, Martina ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
The thesis "The Reflection of Social, Economic and Cultural Changes in Britain in Selected Early Victorian Fiction" aims to investigate the relationship between the First Industrial Revolution in the Great Britain and the English fiction of this era. It deals with the question if the selected authors reflected major industrial and social changes in their writing and if so, what particular events they described. Further, it is focused on the relationship between the novelists and their works, in other words, if there is any connection between their class origin and their point of view of the social problematic displayed in particular novels. It also tries to find out if the prose writers identified themselves with their novel characters and/or if they projected their own life experience into their stories. The work concerns with literary movements represented in selected early Victorian novels: Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, Hard Times, Oliver Twist and The Personal History of David Copperfield the Younger and William Makepeace Thackeray's Vanity Fair. Key words: Social changes, the Industrial Revolution, the Victorian society, social mobility, the class conflict, the novel
Nature of the revolt of The Angry Young Men with reference to selected works of Kingsley Amis and John Osborne
Hronová, Marie ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
TITLE The nature of the revolt of The Angry Young Men with reference to selected works of Kingsley Amis and John Osborne AUTHOR Marie Hronová DEPARTMENT Department of English Language and Literature SUPERVISOR PhDr. Petr Chalupský, Ph.D. ABSTRACT This thesis is concerned with the literature of the Angry Young Men. The theoretical part depicts how World War II influenced the political, social and cultural situation of Britain. One of the main topics of this part is the solution of the post-war financial crisis, therefore the Marshall Aid programme and Welfare State policy are examined, just as their impact on the development of social classes in Britain. Further context is provided by the description of political changes in the late 1940s and the 1950s, specifically of the loss of British colonies and the Suez Crisis of 1956. Moreover, the theoretical part contains an analysis of different tendencies in British post-war literature. The main focus is put on the literature of the 1950s and the authors belonging into the movement of the Angry Young Men. More detailed characteristics of this movement is then featured in the practical part. This part deals with the portrayal and criticism of the social, political and cultural situation of the 1950s in Britain, which is expressed in Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim...
Theme of Memories in Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go and Julian Barnes' The Sense of an Ending
Šrámková, Eva ; Chalupský, Petr (advisor) ; Topolovská, Tereza (referee)
The aim of this bachelor's thesis is to analyse how the theme of memories is represented in two novels of contemporary British literature, Never Let Me Go (2005) by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Sense of an Ending (2011) by Julian Barnes. The thesis is concerned with unreliable narrations of the novels and examines how the theme of memories is integrated in the plotlines. Theoretical part of the thesis focuses on memories from psychological perspective, on the nature of memories, unreliable narrator and output of the authors. In the practical part, the analysis of the selected novels is performed.

National Repository of Grey Literature : 107 records found   beginprevious96 - 105next  jump to record:
Interested in being notified about new results for this query?
Subscribe to the RSS feed.