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Taxonomy, diversity and clinical relevance of the genus Aspergillus
Hubka, Vít ; Kolařík, Miroslav (advisor) ; Labuda, Roman (referee) ; de Beer, Wilhelm (referee)
Aspergillus is a speciose genus encompassing nearly 400 species that has significant economic impacts on human health, the food industry, biotechnology and pharmacology. The research included in this thesis focuses on current issues related to the generic concept, subgeneric classification and species delimitation in Aspergillus. It addresses the need for revisions of several sections or species complexes. It provides novel information regarding etiology of aspergillosis as well as the antifungal susceptibilities of several less common opportunistic pathogens. The taxonomic section of the thesis contributes to the taxonomic stability and the new concept of the genus Aspergillus, which changed in response to the discontinuation of dual nomenclature in fungi. Sufficient arguments were collected (e.g., verification of monophyly, unifying phenotypic characters) for maintaining a broad concept of the genus and avoiding splitting it into several genera. All genera typified by sexual morphs and having Aspergillus asexual states were synonymized with Aspergillus and the appropriate names adopted; new combinations were made for teleomorphic species that lacked Aspergillus names. This thesis also contributed to infrageneric taxonomy of the genus via the proposal of four new sections in the subg. Circumdati,...
Taxonomy, diversity and clinical relevance of the genus Aspergillus
Hubka, Vít ; Kolařík, Miroslav (advisor) ; Labuda, Roman (referee) ; de Beer, Wilhelm (referee)
Aspergillus is a speciose genus encompassing nearly 400 species that has significant economic impacts on human health, the food industry, biotechnology and pharmacology. The research included in this thesis focuses on current issues related to the generic concept, subgeneric classification and species delimitation in Aspergillus. It addresses the need for revisions of several sections or species complexes. It provides novel information regarding etiology of aspergillosis as well as the antifungal susceptibilities of several less common opportunistic pathogens. The taxonomic section of the thesis contributes to the taxonomic stability and the new concept of the genus Aspergillus, which changed in response to the discontinuation of dual nomenclature in fungi. Sufficient arguments were collected (e.g., verification of monophyly, unifying phenotypic characters) for maintaining a broad concept of the genus and avoiding splitting it into several genera. All genera typified by sexual morphs and having Aspergillus asexual states were synonymized with Aspergillus and the appropriate names adopted; new combinations were made for teleomorphic species that lacked Aspergillus names. This thesis also contributed to infrageneric taxonomy of the genus via the proposal of four new sections in the subg. Circumdati,...