National Repository of Grey Literature 32 records found  1 - 10nextend  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
Language and Memory in Hegel's Conception of History
Formanová, Josefina ; Karásek, Jindřich (advisor) ; Matějčková, Tereza (referee)
This work aims, in a rather contemplative manner phased into three related parts, to discuss two concepts indispensable for Hegel's entire philosophy of life and history: language and memory. In Part I, I examine the triple relation between language and thinking, thinking and reality, and reality and language. I argue that language shares a logical structure with thinking and reality, and is itself the performative principle (or acteur) of creating reality, being itself the externalizing tool of the movement of thinking without which any development of the Spirit would not be possible. Part II targets the concept of memory and its function within thinking and action of self-consciousness. It is argued that Hegel's language functions as the modern concept of discourse in terms of its agency in reality. Memory is understood as fundamentally entangled with matter, or the material objectivity that calls in memory to be named, i.e. posited in language. Memory is an interiorizing principle, language is the exteriorizing principle, both deeply rooted in the so-called night of the self of each spirit. I also discuss the subject-objective relation against the background of memory, before moving onto Part III which generally tackles the process of the self-expression of the Spirit in history, the distinction...
Language and Memory in Hegel's Conception of History
Formanová, Josefina ; Karásek, Jindřich (advisor) ; Matějčková, Tereza (referee)
This work aims, in a rather contemplative manner phased into three related parts, to discuss two concepts indispensable for Hegel's entire philosophy of life and history: language and memory. In Part I, I examine the triple relation between language and thinking, thinking and reality, and reality and language. I argue that language shares a logical structure with thinking and reality, and is itself the performative principle (or acteur) of creating reality, being itself the externalizing tool of the movement of thinking without which any development of the Spirit would not be possible. Part II targets the concept of memory and its function within thinking and action of self-consciousness. It is argued that Hegel's language functions as the modern concept of discourse in terms of its agency in reality. Memory is understood as fundamentally entangled with matter, or the material objectivity that calls in memory to be named, i.e. posited in language. Memory is an interiorizing principle, language is the exteriorizing principle, both deeply rooted in the so-called night of the self of each spirit. I also discuss the subject-objective relation against the background of memory, before moving onto Part III which generally tackles the process of the self-expression of the Spirit in history, the distinction...
Self-ownership, its adequacy and comparison with autonomy
Matoška, Lukáš ; Brabec, Martin (advisor) ; Karásek, Jindřich (referee)
The bachelor's thesis deals with selected self-ownership approaches to abortion and suicide. It is based on the observation that in these two areas, the argumentation based on the assumption of self- possession is relatively widespread. The question is to what extent are these approaches adequate, i.e. to what extent do they correspond to real-life situations. A way to assess adequacy is proposed expanding on Margaret Olivia Little. The self-ownership approach to abortion is then shown to be inadequate in specific cases. The thesis also focuses on the libertarian approach to the issue of the right to consensual killing. Discussing the article by Peter Vallentyne, it is shown that defence of this right based on self-ownership may not be sufficient. In this context, it focuses on the relationship between self-ownership and autonomy. It shows that they enable two separate argumentative strategies by which to defend an individual's rights.
Rainer Forst's Theory of Tolerance
Sklenář, Václav ; Matějčková, Tereza (advisor) ; Karásek, Jindřich (referee)
The goal of the presented thesis is to expound and evaluate Rainer Forst's theory of toleration, counting among the most discussed themes in contemporary political theory and practice. A critical reception of the manner in which a leading contemporary political thinker systematically treats this theme will provide us with historical, systematic, and normative orientation in the structure of this complex problematic. The exposition follows Forst's historical analyses explaining the development of the concept and different conceptions of toleration and at the same time supply normative evaluations of individual developmental tendencies. The thesis subsequently focuses on the purely systematic part of Forst's work, i.e. on his own theory of toleration, and situates Forst's contribution in the wider frame of his constructivist theory of justice. The thesis closes with a critical evaluation of Forst's theory. Here, systematic deficiencies of his conception will be uncovered, deficiencies that point towards deeper problems of liberalism and constructivism.
The Concept of Freedom in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism
Gaidarus, Tomáš ; Matějčková, Tereza (advisor) ; Karásek, Jindřich (referee)
Freedom is often associated with F. W. J. Schelling's mature philosophy, especially with his Philosophical Inquiries into the Essence of Human Freedom. The focus of this thesis is, on the contrary, to locate the concept of freedom in his juvenile work, The System of Transcendetnal Idealism. First, we shall present the position of transcendental idealism in the question of the possibility of knowledge. Then we will show, how it comes about, that the absolute I becomes individual conscioussness, and we will finish by presenting the concept of freedom in the context of Schelling's practical philosophy.
Nietzsche's unhappy consciousness and ascetic ideals in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit
Hrouda, Vít ; Matějčková, Tereza (advisor) ; Karásek, Jindřich (referee)
The main focus of this thesis is the self- relation of man to himself that is mediated by a relation to a "true world" or other transcendent entity. The thesis is concerned with conceptions of this self-relation found in Hegel and Nietzsche. For Nietzsche this self-relation is substantiated in the ascetic ideal, which gives meaning to man provided that he negates his liveliness. Hegel deals with this self-relation in the chapter on "Unhappy consciousness", which relates to its essence, to the "Unchangeable", on condition that it denies its body and singularity. The thesis then concentrates on positive aspects that result from such a negative relationship to oneself according to both Hegel and Nietzsche. The main asset shows up to by a tension that is founded in a sunderance of the ascetic and the Unhappy consciousness. From that tension there follows a spirituality, which allows to overcome that sunderance.
The Ground of the World: A Marginal Problem in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit
Matějčková, Tereza ; Karásek, Jindřich (advisor) ; Gutschmidt, Holger (referee) ; Kuneš, Jan (referee)
Is there a world in G. W. F. Hegel's The Phenomenology of Spirit? This is the central question my doctoral thesis aims to address. Both scholars and philosophers alike tend to consider Hegel a thinker who, having formulated the philosophy of absolute spirit, has surrendered the world. Despite this suspicion, the consciousness finds itself at nearly every level of Hegel's oeuvre in a place called "the world". At every stage, the world changes its shape - along with the consciousness - but its function seems to remain the same. The world is a conception of totality; thus, the world is an object of the consciousness that, by definition, surpasses the consciousness and thus reveals its limits. This moment of a "worldly" estrangement is especially pronounced as the consciousness sets itself into action. One of the most recurring motives in Hegel's The Phenomenology of Spirit is the inability of the consciousness to realize its intentions as planned. The consciousness fails to recognize itself in the deed, and thus devises strategies to distance itself from the deed. In my interpretation, this testifies that the deed is the door to the world, and obviously this world is not one that would be in the power of the consciousness. Instead, it is the consciousness that needs to subordinate itself to the deed...
Hegel's Critique of Ideology
Korda, Tomáš ; Karásek, Jindřich (advisor) ; Znoj, Milan (referee)
This work explores the possibilities of Hegel's critique of liberalisms and Marxism. Firstly, I define the "Return to Hegel", or more precisely, the way how we should conceive of this return to Hegel in order to really return to him. In second part, this formal definition of return is given its content, i.e. Hegel's concept of state. This concept had been denied by the doctrine of liberalism as well as of Marxism and this denial, as I try to demonstrate, can be considered a theoretical cause of totalitarianism. Or, in other words, totalitarianism can be speculatively comprehended as the manifestation of this denial. Thus as long as we live in a post-totalitarian era, Hegel is our contemporary. The last part consists of an explication of Hegel's critique of understanding (Verstand). The main reason for this explication is that liberalism and Marxism are 'understanding'- theories of state, and because of that, they were not able to conceive of the state as an object of Reason (Vernunft) and therefore, they failed to recognize the state as rational in itself. The theoretical result of this analysis is that Hegel's critique of understanding can be grasped, so to speak, as a 'critique of ideology avant la lettre', if the concept of ideology is adequately redefined.
Self-Consciousness and Self-Knowledge. A Study on the Role of the Subject and the Awareness of Thought in Descartes' Philosophy
Kollert, Lukáš ; Karásek, Jindřich (advisor) ; Palkoska, Jan (referee)
The thesis aims at examining Descartes's so called cogito from a wider perspective, especially as regards to the role in the development of Meditationes de prima philosophia (1641) and in the context of other relevant texts. Being an attempt to give a broad account of Descartes's "first cognition" the study deals not only with the cogito itself, e.g. with its logical structure, but also with other key Cartesian doctrines, so that we can understand the cogito as an integral part of Descartes's philosophy. The thesis inquires for this reason into the question of meditator's identity, the methodological skepticism, the question whether logical principles are called into question in the First meditation, the problem of the Cartesian circle, the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge, the doctrine of innate ideas and finally, the question how to explain, according to Descartes, the awareness of our thoughts. Sometimes the considerations become rather systematic and go beyond a mere exegesis of Descartes's philosophy, especially when they concern the problem with the presence of ego in cogito and the explanation of our self-consciousness. There are three competing approaches to the second issue mentioned that are introduced and assessed in the last chapter. I have chosen this way of...
Modern Theories of Consciousness and the Elusiveness of Subjectivity
Košová, Michaela ; Hill, James (advisor) ; Karásek, Jindřich (referee)
This diploma thesis is concerned with the question of the right conceptual approach towards consciousness. It opens up with the thesis that the crucial characteristic of consciousness - its subjective aspect - is profoundly elusive. To understand the nature of this elusiveness we get a loose inspiration from Karl Jaspers (of the continental tradition) and his idea of "subject-object dichotomy" whose main point is a realisation that the conscious subject is in principle unobjectifiable and can never be properly grasped by objectifying thinking. This main idea is then applied to various modern theories of consciousness (coming from the analytical tradition) in order to explore and demonstrate to what extend each of the theories misses or acknowledges the specific irreducibility of consciousness to objectively describable phenomena. Thus we observe that J. J. C. Smart omits subjectivity from his identity theory altogether since he understands reality as objectively graspable in all its aspects. Colin McGinn comes with an interesting explanation of our problems with grasping consciousness as part of the physical world and asserts that we are "cognitively closed" with respect to the solution of the mind-body problem. However, he concludes that a possible solution delivered in objectifying terms exists...

National Repository of Grey Literature : 32 records found   1 - 10nextend  jump to record:
See also: similar author names
6 KARÁSEK, Jakub
5 KARÁSEK, Jiří
6 Karásek, Jakub
7 Karásek, Jan
5 Karásek, Jiří
4 Karásek, Josef
Interested in being notified about new results for this query?
Subscribe to the RSS feed.