National Repository of Grey Literature 8 records found  Search took 0.01 seconds. 
The pseudo-Vergilian Poem Ciris: Weaving as Narrative Technique (study and prosaique translation)
Filipová, Nikola ; Bažil, Martin (advisor) ; Ctibor, Michal (referee)
This thesis deals with translation and interpretation of pseudovergilian epyllion Ciris, which tells a story of traitorous princess of Megara, Scylla, who betrays her father Nísos by cutting off his magical purple lock. With it she surrenders the entire city to the enemy Minos in order to secure his love. Her plan ultimately fails and as a result she is transformed into a brand new bird named the ciris. The first part of the thesis provides a literary-theoretical study of the epyllion based on comparison with the sources of the myth and other latin poems, as it seems as if Ciris was composed by an anonymous young disciple in a late latin cento style but only published in his older age. Some ascribe it to young Virgil or Cornelius Gallus. In the course of the study the following questions will be answered: Is Scylla's transformation a liberation or punishment for her crime? What is the role of nutrix in the epyllion and what is her literary origin? How does the author deal with the weaving metaphore? The second part of the thesis offers a first prosaic translation of Ciris into czech language with a humble commentary where deemed necessary.
The pseudo-Vergilian Poem Ciris: Weaving as Narrative Technique (study and prosaique translation)
Filipová, Nikola ; Bažil, Martin (advisor) ; Ctibor, Michal (referee)
This thesis deals with translation and interpretation of pseudovergilian epyllion Ciris, which tells a story of traitorous princess of Megara, Scylla, who betrays her father Nísos by cutting off his magical purple lock. With it she surrenders the entire city to the enemy Minos in order to secure his love. Her plan ultimately fails and as a result she is transformed into a brand new bird named the ciris. The first part of the thesis provides a literary-theoretical study of the epyllion based on comparison with the sources of the myth and other latin poems, as it seems as if Ciris was composed by an anonymous young disciple in a late latin cento style but only published in his older age. Some ascribe it to young Virgil or Cornelius Gallus. In the course of the study the following questions will be answered: Is Scylla's transformation a liberation or punishment for her crime? What is the role of nutrix in the epyllion and what is her literary origin? How does the author deal with the weaving metaphore? The second part of the thesis offers a first prosaic translation of Ciris into czech language with a humble commentary where deemed necessary.
Analysis of Czech Translations of Caesar's Commentarii
Pohl, Martin ; Ctibor, Michal (advisor) ; Vaníková, Martina (referee)
This bachelor thesis deals with Czech translations of Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War. Firstly it offers a quick overview of Czech translations throughout the history. The main focus of the thesis is on comparing the selected translations (i. e. those published from 1940's onward). It tries to capture the essence of each translation by appreciating its characteristic features, which set it apart. Each feature is corroborated by examples. The thesis also raises the question whether there is a need for a new Czech translation of Commentaries. Based on the collected evidence the question is answered in the affirmative. Last but not least the thesis strives to set right some misconceptions regarding the translations (e. g. the second and third releases of Ivan Bureš's translation are, indeed, not the same).
Virtus as a value concept in the books XXI - XXX of Livius
Maixnerová, Monika ; Marek, Václav (advisor) ; Ctibor, Michal (referee)
This bachelor's thesis investigates one of the essential values of the ancient Roman society called virtus. It gives concised summary of the development of the concept of this value during the Roman republic based on the analysis of passages from the chosen ancient sources. Besides it shows the variable meaning of virtus, which depends on the stressed aspect of this value. The main subject of this bachelor's thesis is the interpretation of virtus in the books XXI-XXX of Livy based on the analysis of the author's original text. It focuses on Livy's motivation in the use of this value: it explores which aspect of virtus he accentuates, whom he ascribes it, and studies concrete manifestations of this value. This interpretation might help to understand ancient Roman mentality, which regarded virtus as its fundamental value during the entire Roman history.
"Quid bello Punico secundo?" Reinterpretation of Utterances Traditionally Edited as "Quid" in Classical Latin Texts
Ctibor, Michal ; Pultrová, Lucie (advisor) ; Mouchová, Bohumila (referee) ; Mikulová, Jana (referee)
The present thesis deals with the Latin non-verbal topic-introducing construction "Quid X?" (which is more or less equivalent to Czech "A co X?" or English "What about X?") and with the question of its editing in the classical Latin Texts. The main hypothesis of the present work is that in the classical Latin texts this construction is in hundreds of cases misinterpreted as "Quid?" (the X-part being joined to the following sentence) which would make of this misinterpretation the greatest systematic error in the modern editing of classical Latin texts. The first part of the thesis presents formal, functional and historical arguments to support such a bold claim and describes other non-verbal constructions beginning with the word quid, which might be and in fact are mistaken with the topic-introducing construction "Quid X?". The inability of the modern editors to reliably distinguish between different non-verbal constructions is caused by several objective factors, one of them being also the fact that the construction "Quid X?" - quite extraordinary in several respects - is rarely and (if at all) unsufficiently treated in grammars and reference books. The absence of the description of the given construction is itself, in turn, caused probably by the general underestimating and overlooking of small...
Cicero's Correspondence with M. Terentius Varro (46 - 45 BC.). Translation and interpretation of selected letters.
Kubát, Cyril ; Marek, Václav (advisor) ; Ctibor, Michal (referee)
The main task of this bachelor's thesis is translation and interpretation of Marcus Tullius Cicero's letters addressed to Marcus Terentius Varro from 46 to 45 BC. Apart from the translation and interpretation, it briefly concentrates on the period, in which letters were written, on life, literary works and relationship of both men and on the differences of accentuations in published commentaries. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
Pragmatic Analysis of Vocative in Latin
Ctibor, Michal ; Pultrová, Lucie (advisor) ; Muchnová, Dagmar (referee)
The thesis presents several so far unnoticed functions of (not only) Latin vocative. It argues against previous believes that vocative is used either for addresses, calls and summons, evaluation of addressee and emphasis, or is otherwise only conventional, polite, and thus lacking any real function. Firstly, the author describes vocative from the Speech Act Theory view-point and offers definitions of speech acts call and address. In chapters 3 and 4, he pays attention to vocatives so far considered as lacking function. Relying on the analysis mostly of Cicero's speeches and old Roman comedies, he presents two crucial functions of vocative in non-initial position in a text: 1) vocative as a mean of cohesion which helps to make the organization of the text more transparent and which emphasizes the structure of the text; 2) vocative of assurance/guarantee. In chapter 5, several minor functions of vocative are mentioned (mostly of pragmatic character): triumphal vocative, vocative as a disgrace and vocative as a parody. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
Dual in Troian chronicle
Ctibor, Michal ; Rejzek, Jiří (advisor) ; Andrlová Fidlerová, Alena (referee)
The present thesis deals with the category of dual in Czech, chapter 4 (author's own research based on careful excerption of dual and other relevant forms in the Trojan Chronicle edited by J. Daňhelka) being the core. Preceding introductory chapters focus on the PIE system of number, the category of dual in Czech throughout its whole existence and characteristics of the source text, respectively. The author considers its main value being in: (I) introducing A. Cuny's classification of the dual usage in PIE (chapter 2) and applying it to the Czech material (chapters 2 and 4); (II) overall assessment of the current position of dual remnants in Czech (chapter 2); (III) providing the data regarding dual in the Trojan Chronicle, which were not available before (chapter 4).

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