National Repository of Grey Literature 40 records found  1 - 10nextend  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
ZÍSKEJ – national system for sharing and delivering documents
Pokorný, Jan
A software platform called “ZÍSKEJ” (Get it) for documents sharing and delivery was designed and developed at the National Library of Technology as a nationwide system for public libraries in the Czech Republic. The project was supported by the Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic. The system ZÍSKEJ is published as open source with a GNU Public License (GPL). ZÍSKEJ is a server application that is capable of managing user’s document requests through its web client or local integration using the available API. The system is based on a request management module that automatically handles the queue of incoming requests to deliver the document requested by end users or by libraries that serve end-users.
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When there’s only one: resource sharing and the predicament of the dissertation request
Eighmy Brown, Melissa ; Smith, Austin ; Thompson, Hilary H.
Electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) are one of the many resources interspersed throughout the current environment of online content. The past two decades have witnessed a shift from print to electronic theses and dissertations and an accompanying growth in university mandates requiring deposit of ETDs in institutional repositories. While these changes should have paved the way for unfettered online access, barriers such as embargoes requested by the author and vendor licensing restrictions have also emerged, hampering access to these unpublished works. Likewise, policies governing cataloging, deposit, and repository access may differ widely across institutions, adding further complexity to the landscape. Interlibrary Loan practitioners are looking for ways to share this unique content and help users navigate the terrain despite the obstacles. This presentation will explore recent trends in thesis requesting and fulfillment using borrowing and lending requests for theses and dissertations from two U.S. public research universities, along with the perspectives of colleagues at peer institutions. These data sets demonstrate that the demand for these materials extends across borders, raising the question: how can we encourage the sharing of ETDs on a global scale? The authors hope their research on the accessibility of theses and dissertations will inform the international academic community on ways to improve the sharing of these important institutional assets, including raising awareness of the need for a policy and workflow that permits controlled ILL lending of embargoed ETDs that mirrors lending of print dissertations.
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A progressive approach to reducing barriers to resource sharing: a Canadian example
Askey, Dale ; Jong, CJ de ; Koufogiannakis, Denise
The University of Alberta Library (UAL) holds one of the largest collections in Western Canada and recently opened a storage facility with capacity for five million volumes. UAL’s collection and staffing capacity make us a significant net lender of materials to other libraries. Being cognizant of this role, UAL is attempting, via consortial bodies at the local, provincial, regional, and national levels, to advance a progressive approach to resource sharing by reducing administrative burden and strategically working towards new ways of resource sharing via digital means. This presentation outlines our context and approach, offering a sense of adaptability and scalability that could be replicated in other contexts. Scaling and extending the work UAL does at the provincial level to the regional and national level requires us to demonstrate a high degree of commitment to our partners. Often, net lenders can be hesitant to open the gates to their collections for fear of creating unmanageable demand. We accept that risk and, in general, are trying to develop a stronger sense of risk tolerance. One strategy we pursue is to remove barriers in resource sharing, via concrete actions such as the elimination of fees that generate small amounts of income from lending, longer and more flexible loan periods, and controlled digital access to unique materials. UAL is developing digitization priorities in part to support this practice, facilitating greater access to our consortial partners and anyone needing access to materials we may uniquely hold. Within a complex global environment, UAL continues to look for ways to reduce barriers to information, and to share our resources widely in keeping with our University’s raison d’etre of “uplifting the whole people”.
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Project ReShare: an open, community-owned, resource sharing solution
Dethloff, Nora ; Ibbotson, Ian ; Rose, Kristina ; Thompson, Sydney
The ReShare Community is a group of libraries, information organizations, and developers, with both commercial and non-commercial interests, who came together in 2018 to create a new and open approach to library resource sharing systems. Libraries have long established protocols and agreements among local, regional, national, and international networks to provide discovery and access to print and digital resources, extending the use and value of each library’s collection exponentially. However, current resource sharing solutions leave much to be desired. The marketplace has been characterized by stagnating technology, closed or siloed environments, and a consolidation of commercial options, leaving consortia to desire a fresh start; a re-imagined infrastructure that promotes an increased ability to innovate, experiment, and communicate across diverse library systems (ILS, discovery, resource sharing, etc.) and more sustainably pursue shared collection development and print retention initiatives. ReShare aims to inject new life into the space by developing a community-owned, modular resource sharing platform, enabling libraries and consortia to place library users at the center, from discovery, to request management and fulfillment. Project ReShare’s key differentiator is its foundation as a wholly community-owned solution. This approach offers libraries and commercial partners a fundamentally new model for shaping collections and connecting people with what they need, by greatly deepening our ability to collaborate and develop systems responsive to the needs of libraries and their users. In this paper, members of the Project ReShare Steering Committee and Product Management Team explore the frustrations with the current resource sharing environment, share perspectives on the importance of community-owned, open source tools, and discuss the benefits of this type of collaboration for the library community at large. The paper tells the story of Project ReShare, including how it is being developed, how the community has grown, and the potential for this new resource sharing solution.
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ILL for e-books: four years of experience - learning to walk
Gillitzer, Berthold
Currently, ILL is sometimes regarded as an old-fashioned standard service of libraries which becomes obsolete through the plenty of information available on the internet. In contrast to that opinion, I want to emphasize that ILL considered as a network of libraries for sharing scarce resources is a very modern concept. Due to the lack of contract clauses or restrictions within existing contract clauses of licensed e-journals or licensed e-books, in the last few years a permanently growing gap within ILL has arisen. More and more documents are not available via ILL and, in consequence, they are not available at all for users needing them urgently. For this reason, the Bavarian State Library and the Bavarian Library Network have since 2013 developed a concept for a solution for this problem. A server for the storing of license information and provision of the respective documents are part of this project as well as the development of appropriate license agreements. While a solution for e-journals is successfully up and running and more than 30% of copies from articles within ILL are provided from e-journals (at least in Bavaria), e-books seem to be a hard nut to crack. There are not any license clauses for ILL at all for e-books in ILL and the modalities for delivery and respective license conditions are controversial between libraries and publishers. The Bavarian State Library started a project to solve these problems together with the Bavarian Library Network. A pilot service has been running successfully since July 2015 and five publishers are cooperating for the test of the conception and first experiences with e-books and ILL. Nevertheless, publisher and holders of rights are sceptical and much work is still to be done until ILL for e-media becomes a regular part of the services provided by libraries. Perhaps international cooperation could be a key to convince the big publishers that a solution for these problems is necessary. The pilot period over the last 4 years shows that the technical solution and the conception are basically successful.
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From interlending to resource sharing between scholars?: an analysis of recent developments
Saarti, Jarmo ; Tuominen, Kimmo
Even though resource sharing between scholars is evolving rapidly, we still have paper-based interlibrary lending (ILL) procedures in use. However, the current business model of acquiring toll-access journals and e-books does not seem to fit very well with traditional ILL practices. In addition, the new models of peer-to-peer resource sharing between academics seem to be much more effective than ILL. Scholars arrange access to the needed publications by using legal (buying, exchanging) and illegal means (Sci-Hub, etc.) for accessing the publications they need. Furthermore, the demands for open access (OA) have increased, voiced not only by librarians and science funders but also by politicians. This development might change the scholarly publication ecosystem, even though older publications are still likely to remain closed. In the present paper, we contrast the ILL and usage statistics of Finnish university libraries with the use of ResearchGate, a popular academic social network, which we treat as an example of a peer-to-peer sharing service. Based on the data, we attempt to understand how resource sharing, on the one hand formally between institutions, and on the other hand informally between scholars, will develop in the digital and increasingly open future.
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Engineering a powerfully simple interlibrary loan experience with InstantILL
Paxton, Mike ; Maixner, Gary ; McArthur, Joseph ; Baich, Tina
IUPUI University Library (UL) has long recognized the need to advance open access and the crucial role resource sharing services play in bridging between the subscription-based world and an Open world. Resource sharing professionals frequently use library services to search for and retrieve known items, and thus have a key role not only in the provision of services but in demanding better discovery systems, promoting new and better discovery and delivery tools, and educating users. As services such as Primo, EDS, and Google Scholar combine with library website design to promote central indexes, it is increasingly unrealistic to expect the average user to search multiple unpromoted channels for what they need, and so libraries must work to make all aspects of discovery and delivery similarly straightforward. Resource sharing professionals can make significant inroads in improving discovery and delivery of open access and subscription content by partnering with Open projects to improve the library user’s experience when searching for known content. This paper will share how UL has taken a concrete step in this direction by working with the Open Access Button to develop InstantILL, a simple, community-owned, search tool for students and researchers to get free, fast, and legal access to articles. With a simple interface that users expect, InstantILL integrates searching library holdings, searching open access materials, and submitting interlibrary loan requests into a single action. Attendees will learn why the library chose to pursue this project, what InstantILL is and how it was designed and developed, and the results of the implementation.
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Digital possibilities in international interlibrary lending: with or despite German copyright law
Clasen, Nicole
The German interlibrary loan service is a good and solid basic solution for the supply of literature between libraries within Germany and some other countries. It has proven itself both nationally and internationally. But in what form will it be needed in the future? Which digital possibilities does it offer our users regarding delivery or electronic media? Copyright law in Germany promises to have the right answers to the demands of modern digital working and studying. But does the copyright law also make this possible for German interlibrary lending? German libraries have the advantage that only a few countries worldwide have a copyright that contains a special section for interlibrary lending, and Germany is one of them. However, this positive effect does not make it easier for foreign libraries.
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Analysis of the development direction of a conceptual academic library resource sharing service based on a case study of DXY
Niu, Xiaofei ; Zhang, Ling ; Han, Li
Under a global environment characterized by open and complex information, academic library resource-sharing practitioners should observe the information-service market beyond a “library-oriented” setting and rethink the development direction of the service. To investigate this issue, this paper presents an analysis of the development trajectory and characteristics of DXY, a Chinese information service enterprise. This study also discusses the development of academic library resource-sharing service from three dimensions, namely, service targets, service contents, and service roles. Findings show that the academic library resource-sharing practitioners should break through the traditional cognitive framework of “academic users on campus” and “document providers,” and furthermore, consider upgrading the service to assume a comprehensive role as information sharer, information connector, and platform operator simultaneously. This change will enable the move toward a knowledge service orientation.
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