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Ability of copper chelators to interact with iron and zinc
Hanuščinová, Lucia ; Mladěnka, Přemysl (advisor) ; Čonka, Patrik (referee)
Charles University Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Student: Lucia Hanuščinová Supervisor: Assoc. Prof. Přemysl Mladěnka, PharmDr., PhD. Title of diploma thesis: Ability of copper chelators to interact with iron and zinc Copper plays in the human organism a role of an element with indispensable significance, whose biological influence and effects depend on its quantity. With elevated concentrations in the human body, copper becomes toxic, resulting in pathological conditions. The most well-known diseases is the Wilson's disease, whose treatment consists of oral administration of chelators, i.e. chemical compounds, which are capable of binding copper ions in various proportions and eliminating them from the organism. Chelation therapy is currently the first choice after confirmation of the diagnosis. Chelation toxicity results from several factors, e.g. inhibition of copper dependent enzymes or low selectivity to metals. And precisely the selectivity of chelators is being discussed in this diploma thesis. An ideal chelator should not interact with any of the other physiological ions, that are necessary for the proper functioning of the organism. Five of the most frequently therapeutically or experimentally used substances /trientine, D-penicillamine,...
Ability of copper chelators to interact with iron and zinc
Hanuščinová, Lucia ; Mladěnka, Přemysl (advisor) ; Čonka, Patrik (referee)
Charles University Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Student: Lucia Hanuščinová Supervisor: Assoc. Prof. Přemysl Mladěnka, PharmDr., PhD. Title of diploma thesis: Ability of copper chelators to interact with iron and zinc Copper plays in the human organism a role of an element with indispensable significance, whose biological influence and effects depend on its quantity. With elevated concentrations in the human body, copper becomes toxic, resulting in pathological conditions. The most well-known diseases is the Wilson's disease, whose treatment consists of oral administration of chelators, i.e. chemical compounds, which are capable of binding copper ions in various proportions and eliminating them from the organism. Chelation therapy is currently the first choice after confirmation of the diagnosis. Chelation toxicity results from several factors, e.g. inhibition of copper dependent enzymes or low selectivity to metals. And precisely the selectivity of chelators is being discussed in this diploma thesis. An ideal chelator should not interact with any of the other physiological ions, that are necessary for the proper functioning of the organism. Five of the most frequently therapeutically or experimentally used substances /trientine, D-penicillamine,...

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