National Repository of Grey Literature 89 records found  1 - 10nextend  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
International Regimes against Trafficking in Human Beings: European Experience
Prixová, Barbora ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Knutelská, Viera (referee)
The target of this research is to reveal causal factors that influence the way policy goals and instruments of international organizations in the domain of human trafficking are designed. By tracking evolutions of anti-trafficking policies undergone by the Council of Europe and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the thesis demonstrates impact of specific factors on changes in the functioning of international organizations. To unravel mechanism explaining the internal workings of a policy formation within an IO, the thesis considers and tests theoretical assumptions of three rivalling theories on institutions; the realism, historical institutionalism and neoliberal institutionalism. Premises of respective theories, which offer contrasting perspectives on the functioning of international organizations, will help to formulate corresponding independent variables. The dependant variable being the changing design of institutions, the detailed cross-case analysis spanning a period of one decade uncovers causal relations between independent dependent variables. Thus, by means of time series data collection, patterns revealing which of independent variables can be designed as responsible for observed changes becomes visible. In this way, the study is able to answer to what extent...
The limits of the EU's political conditionality approach in Western Balkans
Křiklánová, Michaela ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Kučerová, Irah (referee)
The thesis aims to unravel the relationship between the EU's enlargement strategies and democratization in the Western Balkan countries by looking on the impact of the strategies on changing democracy levels in two empirical cases: the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Serbia. Over more than a decade, the effect of the conditionality tool on democratization has been curbed by an insufficient emphasis placed on pro-democratic reforms and by the role of security concerns which were often prioritized over aims directly linked to democracy promotion. Grounded in the conflicting objectives theory, the thesis demonstrates that the recently employed strategy appropriately sequencing goals while prioritizing democratic transition over security concerns is more effective in inflicting domestic democratic change. Subsequently, the following necessary and sufficient conditions for a successful sequencing strategy were defined: strong emphasis on democracy-related goals combined with clearly outlined temporal perspective, and corresponding action of international actors.
Explaining the UN Security Council's Selective Involvement in African Conflicts
Urbánek, Daniel ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Daniel, Jan (referee)
The debate over possible selective involvement of the United Nations Security Council in armed conflicts is currently re-emerging both in the academic discussions and in the sphere of practical politics. This thesis aims at explaining the possible reasoning behind this selectivity - often exemplified by the contrasting participation of the United Nations in the crises of Libya and Syria - through a qualitative case study focusing on African intrastate wars. Two possible factors, influencing the Council's decision making, are based on classical theories of International Relations - while realism stresses the interests of the five permanent members of the Council, constructivism puts an emphasis on the normative goals of the organization, therefore on the role of the crisis' severity. The impact of these variables is subsequently assessed within the civil wars in Algeria, Burundi, Djibouti and Guinea-Bissau, with an attempt to depict the relationship between the discussed explanatory factors and the eventual activity of the Security Council.
Quantum Theory of International Relations: Modeling Strategic Interaction with Quantum Probability Theory
Tesař, Jakub ; Drulák, Petr (advisor) ; Tyc, Tomáš (referee) ; Karlas, Jan (referee)
Recent results from cognitive psychology suggest that human behavior can be, in some situations, better described by laws known from physical quantum theory. This work responds to this development and seeks to answer the question of how quantum models of cognition and decision-making can contribute to our understanding of the social world. We introduce the approaches to the application of quantum theory in social sciences - quantum consciousness, quantum reasoning and quantum metaphor and further develop the second, in the context of strategic interaction in game theory. We show that the quantum model corresponds to both the psychological intuition and many empirically known anomalies such as the order effect, disjunction effect, or context effect. In this work, we derive a specific model of strategic interaction between two players, and we test it in the experimental Prisoner's Dilemma game. The model is based on the rational choice theory, which is nevertheless re-defined when it is shown how the strategic choice is changed if the quantum probability (C*-algebra) is used as the underlying theory instead of classical probability (σ-algebra). The results obtained support the quantum model and showed a different representation of the game among various groups of players. The quantum model of...
International regime of climate protection in the light of commitments of selected Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
Štěpánek, Přemysl ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Braun, Mats (referee) ; Kučerová, Irah (referee)
1 Název práce: Mezinárodní režim ochrany klimatu ve světle závazků vybraných smluvních stran Rámcové úmluvy OSN o změně klimatu Autor práce: PhDr. Ing. Přemysl Štěpánek Školitel: Doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, M.A., Ph.D. Pracoviště: Univerzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Institut politologických studií, Katedra mezinárodních vztahů. Rok obhajoby: 2018 Abstract To complement the current research on countries' action in relation to global public goods, this dissertation examines the strength of UNFCCC Parties' emission commitments and the influence of selected factors derived from rationalism and constructivism on the strength of these commitments in two different contexts, under the Copenhagen Accord (2009) and the Paris Agreement (2015). Using a multiple linear regression analysis on the sample of 27 and 54 cases in the first and the second period, respectively, and as well as through case studies on three important UNFCCC Parties with a strong commitment and variance in values of the independent variables (the European Union, the Russian Federation, South Africa), the conclusions are as follows. The regression analysis in both contexts showed, in line with the assumptions, the positive influence of two factors on the strength of commitments, namely the share of alternative and nuclear energy and economic...
EU effects on migration policy
Wittke, Felina Katharina ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Knutelská, Viera (referee)
The 2015 refugee crisis clearly highlighted that the European asylum system is flawed and triggered a heated discussion on the functioning and appropriateness of the Dublin Regulation. The present research tries to account for differences in the implementation of the Dublin regime from its coming into force in 1997 until today, by testing the three possibly influencing factors 'misfit', administrative capacity and overall situation for Germany, Hungary and Italy. The comparative case study first ascertains that Germany implements the obligations to a medium to high degree, while Hungary presents a low and Italy a medium-low implementation record. The analysis of the single variables shows that the higher the compatibility between the national and the European asylum system at the moment of adhering to the Dublin system, the more diligently a country implements it. While no clear claims can be made if and how the administrative capacity of a state affects implementation, the economic situation does have an impact in the sense that a stronger overall state of the economy appears to have positive effects on implementation. The research is part of the general research framework of Europeanization and contributes to the scholarship on implementation. By shedding light on the factors leading to...
Analysis of the relationship between Taiwan and the Chinese People's Republic from the mid-1980s to the present
Raida, Daniel ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Záhora, Jakub (referee)
The aim of this thesis is to explain the dynamic of Taiwanese foreign policy in relation to the Peoples Republic of China since the late 1980s to the present by using three theoretical traditions of international relations. To that end, several hypotheses will be formulated after analysing these traditions (realist, liberal and constructivist) and then applied on the subject of this research. The dependent variable was identified as the conflictive attitude of Taiwanese foreign policy in a given time period. In terms of methodology this is a case study. This research is divided into four chapters the first of which analyses the above mentioned theoretical traditional. The second part briefly describes the historical context necessary to understand the problematic nature of Taiwanese national identity. The third chapter analyses Taiwanese foreign policy in relation to China during time periods representing the terms of office of three democratic presidents of Taiwan. The last fourth chapter is to the analysis of independent variables and the evaluation of hypotheses. This research showed that of the tested theories neither one is able to explain the development of Taiwanese foreign policy in the examined period. The analysis however suggested that there might be a correlation between the ideology...
Impact of transnational advocacy networks on environmental policy and outcomes
Morin-Robinson, Thomas ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Parízek, Michal (referee)
Transnational climate governance networks, composed of sub-state and private actors, are being increasingly recognized in the international climate regime, most recently at the 2015 UNFCCC summit in Paris. Urban centres and their own networks, trans-municipal climate networks such as ICLEI and C40, have been particularly touted as a decentralized solution to climate policy collective action problems at the level of the nation-state. These networks help motivated cities acquire resources and policy guidance, as well as reframe climate policy as more universal and cities as climate leaders. But do they really improve climate output? Do cities in trans-municipal networks pass more climate policy than non-members? This study examines a sample of 190 cities in 26 OECD countries which self-reported their climate actions in the year 2017. Using a multi-level regression model, the study accounts for control variables at both the urban and state level for climate exposure, available resources, and political factors, finding that networked cities do pass more policies than their non-networked peers. It also provides more limited evidence that more networks may compound this effect. State level factors appear generally not to have a significant effect on city level policy, save for the degree of fossil fuel...
The European Union and the adoption of the Stabilization and Association Agreement with Kosovo: the role of material interests and shared ideas
Procházka, Karel ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Kučerová, Irah (referee)
The thesis seeks to examine the underlying motivations behind the conclusion of the Stability and Association Agreement between European Union and Kosovo on the 27th of October 2015. To determine the role of material interests and shared ideas in the process of concluding the SAA the thesis discusses and applies rationalism and constructivism, both grand theories of international relations. To test the theories and their respective hypotheses identifying the role of the relevant concepts, the research employs a single case study method, using a congruence analysis approach. In conclusion, through the rationalist lens within the perspective of the EU, the thesis confirms the existence of material interest in the conclusion of the SAA, representing security, power and economic gains. To complement the analysis via a constructivist lens within the perspective of Kosovo, the thesis solely implies a limited role of identity and norms while it points out that such constructivist concepts rather impeded the reaching of the SAA, veiling the actual role of material interest.
Explaining the UN Security Council's Selective Involvement in African Conflicts
Urbánek, Daniel ; Karlas, Jan (advisor) ; Daniel, Jan (referee)
The debate over possible selective involvement of the United Nations Security Council in armed conflicts is currently re-emerging both in the academic discussions and in the sphere of practical politics. This thesis aims at explaining the possible reasoning behind this selectivity - often exemplified by the contrasting participation of the United Nations in the crises of Libya and Syria - through a qualitative case study focusing on African intrastate wars. Two possible factors, influencing the Council's decision making, are based on classical theories of International Relations - while realism stresses the interests of the five permanent members of the Council, constructivism puts an emphasis on the normative goals of the organization, therefore on the role of the crisis' severity. The impact of these variables is subsequently assessed within the civil wars in Algeria, Burundi, Djibouti and Guinea-Bissau, with an attempt to depict the relationship between the discussed explanatory factors and the eventual activity of the Security Council.

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